Monday, July 26, 2010

Whisper on the Wind by Maureen Lang

In 1916, World War I rages and German-occupied Belgium is hardly an ideal setting for romance. Yet, Isa Lassone, whose wealthy family left Belgium at the beginning of the war, returns to find the man she has loved for as long as she can remember, Edward Kirkland. When he refuses to leave Belgium with her, she vows to stay and moves back to the home she grew up in. She soon realizes that Edward is involved in an underground newspaper and offers her assistance. According to German forces, publishing an underground newspaper is worthy of the death sentence and Isa knowingly accepts the risk. As Isa and Edward work together, their hearts bind together in a way they never have before. As danger looms uncomfortably close, Edward seeks to protect all those he loves. His efforts fail miserably until he acknowledges that only God can truly protect Isa and his family.

Whisper on the Wind is the first World War I fiction book that I've read in years. Generally, I stay away from war-related stories; however, I can honestly say that I enjoyed this one. The plot gripped me almost from the beginning. I loved the combination of action, adventure and romance. I think the mystery element of how Isa and Edward could possibly survive worked very well for the story. A good read for anyone who likes historical romances.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this Advance Reader Copy of Whisper on the Wind from Tyndale House Publishers as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

Friday, July 16, 2010

Swag Buck Time

I Just Won 1 Swag Buck on www.swagbucks.com

I'm new to the program, but I guess 1 is better than none.

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Jane Austen: Christian Encounters

Jane Austen by Peter Leithart is a biography focusing on one of the most talented writers in history. Well-known classics such as Pride and Prejudice and Emma were written by Austen. Leithart presents Austen’s biography from a somewhat Christian perspective. He does not make her seem like a saint, but he does point out many details in her writing that he believes illustrates her personal faith. The biography covers Austen’s entire life and gives an extensive accounting of her family tree.

This biography of Jane Austen was very detailed and I certainly can appreciate detail. However, at times it was tedious to read because of the amount of detail. I greatly enjoyed chapter five which addressed Austen as a published author. This is a book that I would recommend checking out from the library before you buy. A Jane Austen fanatic would probably love it, but a less enthusiastic reader might not get past chapter two.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from BookSneeze.com as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commision's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

Friday, July 2, 2010

Deadly Disclosures

Dinah Harris was a one time a highly skilled FBI agent. Now she has been delegated to teaching a class while she fights depression, numbness and alcohol addiction. When a former partner, pressures her to help him with the murder case of the secretary of the Smithsonian, she hopes to escape the emptiness inside. Unfortunately, the emptiness remains. Through events related to the case she is brought into contact with a former friend of the deceased secretary who seems to think that the murder may have been motivated by the secretary’s religious beliefs. When additional bodies appear, Dinah must fight her personal issues at the same time she searches for a murderer.

Deadly Disclosures by Julie Cave was very interesting to read. The plot was well-written and the mystery element of the story kept me guessing about who was behind the murders and why were the murders done. The ending satisfactorily closed the case and the story; however, it certainly left a strong hint about the upcoming sequel to this book. The author did an excellent job of addressing Dinah’s depression and alcohol addiction. She did not gloss over it and seemed to express the situation realistically. I appreciate authenticity.

Although I certainly consider myself a Creationist, I must admit that all the Creationist talk at times got to be a little to much for me. Not that I disagreed with what was said, but it seemed like certain characters would go on long diatribes explaining Creationism. I think one weakness of the book is that it almost blasts the reader over the head with Creationism. I certainly am not against Christian views being presented by Christian authors in Christian fiction books; however, I think it could have been done with more tact. It certainly would not have appealed to someone who was not a Christian. With a little different style, the material could have been presented in a way that an unbeliever would still be interested in the story, at least. Unfortunately, the way the material was presented was more overwhelming than appealing.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from New Leaf Publishing Group as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commision's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."